For all those who make their home Aboard!

Black Rock Harbor Bridgeport, CT

Black Rock Harbor Bridgeport, CT

The notion hit me like a ton of bricks late one afternoon as I struggled to come up with the cash to pay rent, “Why don’t I live on a boat?” It was late February in 2006 when I was living in a third floor walk up in the Black Rock section of Bridgeport. My roommate was a late 20’s drama queen with a passion for complaining and pension for prescription drugs. And once again I was wondering, as she whirled around the living room after being up for three days straight without sleep, why I paid rent to live with such a person when from my window over looking Black Rock Harbor I could see a fleet of boats bobbing on their moorings. Why didn’t I just buy a boat and live on it instead of struggling to live the life that was prescribed to me by social norms that came with all the bills, conflicts and contrivances of life on land? And that was the afternoon I decided that my boat would be my home and I started the process of buying my 1976 Cal 34’ named “Mystique”.

These are two of my chickens we used for tick and insect eradication at the Landfill. They were prolific egg layers but I was hesitant to eat the eggs from a Bridgeport Landfill.

These are two of my chickens we used for tick and insect eradication at the Landfill. They were prolific egg layers but I was hesitant to eat the eggs from a Bridgeport Landfill.

I could now go into all the adventures I had living on that boat which eventually morphed into me living in an office trailer way off the grid as an Urban Pioneer in a landfill complete with a flock of chickens, my dog Buxton and a living array that would have made the Professor on Gilligan’s Island green with envy. But yet I digress. This blog is going out to all those who wish to, are working to or already have made the choice to live the live aboard life on their own. You don’t need to hear about my live aboard life, half as much as you need to hear why we (my wife and I) are starting a club for those who share a thought to make the live aboard life their own.

This is Buxton during our Luau at the Landfill. You can see the boats behind her in the Harbor

This is Buxton during our Luau at the Landfill. You can see the boats behind her in the Harbor

The why is so much more important as so many think they want to live in a boat or in an RV and so many more have already attempted to cast off the sticks and bricks existence only to find themselves back in two bedrooms and a bath before long on a cul de sac in Suburbia USA.

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Modern America is downright hostile to the those who chose to make their home in a boat or a RV. Don’t believe me? Look to my now hometown who just made anchoring a crime . Or look to Florida or Connecticut who also claim the bottom lands as their own as if deeded to them through the ages from Poseidon himself. It used to be that what lies beneath belonged to everyone, but as the steady stream of Big Brother America has washed over the modern age, now to attach ones boat to the sand of some harbor or river is to sin against the waterfront property owners and by extension the politicians they pay to keep the common man out of their multi-million dollar views.

And what of the Motor Homers who rumble across the highways and by-ways of North America bouncing from Walmart Parking Lot to Walmart Parking lot, unable to stop for any period of time for fear that they might grow roots or the grand kids might catch up? What used to be the right of every American to stop for a spell on the highway to have a sandwich and catch 20 winks has turned into a contrived cat and mouse game where you fight truckers for space at rest stops and are looked down upon if your trailer is anything other than a carbon copy of the latest and greatest assembly line rolling Clorox bottles. Where are the tiny homers, the Bus Reclaimants and the Airstream Resurrectionists supposed to stop to fill up, wind down and kick back before rolling on?

This is the problem we aim to solve. And how do we solve it? We Unite.

We think boaters and motor homers deserve a soft place to land when their eyes grow weary and their clothes begin to walk by themselves and we aim to create a network of places to serve them. A place to have a hot shower, get a good meal and a warm spot to spend the night where like minds will welcome you with a smile and see the same beauty of the rising sun when they set sail for the next harbor or hit the road for Akron on Monday morning.

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The Charted Life Yacht and Motor Club will spread out across the North American Continent, starting with a club house we aim to build in Beaufort, NC on Radio Island at the Cross roads of the North Atlantic in 2019. We are launching an effort to create a series of facilities for Boaters and Motorhomers that will stretch from sea to shining sea, all the way from the Panama Canal to the Yukon Territory and every where in between. At each of these facilities, those who who wish to live or are living the mobile life whether they make their life on land or sea, will find a smiling face, a helpful hand and a spot to call home for a few days or up to a few weeks. If you need a place to do laundry, we aim to serve. Need a spot to get a water pump delivered? We’ll be there. Or you just need a spot to tie up to get out of the storm for a few hours that is affordable, safe and friendly, we want to help. The Charted Life Yacht and Motor Club aims to welcome boaters and motorhomers to join our fleet from all walks of life regardless of what you call home. And we aim to do it for a little more than a gym membership will cost you.

If the mobile life speaks to you and you want to lend your hand in helping to grow this club, give us a call at 252-617-3792 or shoot us a message. Thanks.